Group Roundtables

BCIU's roundtable events are informal, off-the-record meetings between senior business executives and government leaders. They are often organized around high-profile diplomats, foreign dignitaries and officials working in the areas of foreign policy, trade, development and security. BCIU organizes more than 150 of these group roundtables each year in New York, Washington, D.C., Houston and other U.S. and international locations.

The roundtables typically feature remarks by the featured guest, followed by a candid, in-depth question-and-answer period. The intimate level of dialogue offers government officials excellent opportunities to engage directly with executives from leading companies across multiple industries and strengthen mutually beneficial relationships with them through the exchange of opinions, insights and information on key issues relative to their portfolio, country or region.

Government officials that regularly participate in BCIU roundtables include:

  • Newly appointed U.S. ambassadors before their assignments overseas
  • Foreign diplomats newly posted or travelling to the United States
  • Leaders from U.S. government departments and agencies with foreign policy, trade, development and security responsibilities
  • Key ministers and heads of state during bilateral visits, economic dialogues and multilateral institution gatherings such as the United Nations General Assembly meetings and International Monetary Fund/World Bank Spring and Annual meetings

Roundtable meetings usually take place over breakfast, lunch or dinner and informal interactions with attending executives are often an added benefit for officials seeking to build long-term relationships with the business community.

Benefits

  • Allow for introductions and face-to-face conversations between senior business executives and government officials.
  • Provide an opportunity for all those present, including both government officials and business executives, to network and make new contacts across multiple industries.
  • Enable government officials to hear firsthand reports from business executives about challenges and experiences related to their portfolio, country or region.

Examples

  • Luncheon discussion in New York with His Excellency John Dramani Mahama, President of the Republic of Ghana
  • Roundtable discussion in New York with the Honorable Max Baucus, Ambassador of the United States to China
  • Luncheon discussion in Washington, D.C. with the Honorable Michael Daniel, Special Assistant to the President and Cybersecurity Coordinator for the White House
  • Roundtable discussion in New York with His Excellency Cesar Purisima, Secretary of Finance and His Excellency Gregory Domingo, Secretary of Trade and Industry for the Republic of the Philippines
  • Luncheon roundtable in Washington, D.C. with Ambassador David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Relations, U.S. Department of Energy